The PCGraphics ‘Who’s Who’ of Tourism Companies

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We mentioned (ok, boasted) recently in a blog post about the number of Tour Operator and Tourism companies we’ve worked with over the years. Well…we decided to see just how many we could find in a quick search through our records. Ok, so we were bored and had a few minutes to spare in the office!

It reads a bit like a Who’s Who of tourism. There’s some big names in there, plus some smaller outfits too.

Have a quick look and see if we’ve drawn maps for your holiday company.

Deep breath, here we go…

Accoladia
Accommodation Line
Acorn Ski
Affinity Villas
Africa & Asia Venture
Africa Travel Centre
American Holidays
Audley Travel Group
Bailey Robinson
Balfour France
Belfast International Airport
Bonnes Vacances
British Airways Holidays
Bufo Ventures
CARIBTOURS
Cassis Travel Services
Castaways Holidays
Citysightseeing
Classic Crete
Colours Of Oz
Consort Travel
Croatian Villas
Crossgates
Dilos Holiday World
Driveline
Edwin Doran’s Travel World
Emerald Global
European Travel Commission
Farside Africa
Fast Track Holidays
Fens Tourism
First Choice Holidays
French Golf Holidays
Geodyssey
Getaway UK
Helpful Holidays
Holiday Options
Holidays 4U
Honeymoon Worldwide Holidays
Hotel Connect
Hotels Abroad
Ian Mearns Holidays
IMS Travel & Consultancy
International Chapters
International Travel Connections
Iron Donkey Bicycle Touring
Isle of Wight Tourism
Kerala Connections
Kirker Holidays
Kuoni Voyages
Lupus Travel
Major Travel
Mallorca Farmhouses
Manos Travel
Mayo Naturally
Med Hotels
MyStay
New Experience Holidays
Not Just Villas
Ocean Explorer
Quark Expeditions
Quest Travel
Recommended Hotels
Regent Holidays
Room Service
Routes Online
Russia Revealed
SAS – Scandinavian Airline System
Select Apartments
Shearings Holidays
Shetland Island Tourism
Ski Activity
Ski Class
Something Special
Sovereign Holidays
STA Travel
Sunways
Swan Hellenic
The Caravan Club
The Peru Experience
The Responsible Safari Company
The Ultimate Travel Company
Thomson Travel Group
Tim Best Travel
Tony Backhurst Scuba Travel
Travelbeam
Travelbound
Traveleads
TUI
Venue Holidays
Vintage Travel
Virgin Holidays
Visit Norwich
Voyager Zambia
Wanderlust
Western Oriental
Westport Tourism
Wilderness Dawning Safaris
Worldwide Holidays Direct
WOTIF.COM
Yes Travel

falklands CPM2 Template landscape.ai peru Botswana Rwanda-Uganda ATG 09 design template IHM NEWPORT 2012 final KP Croatia Capable_Travel

For some of these clients we’ve already been busy creating new mapping and revising existing maps for their 2015 holiday destinations – and it’s only the end of October 2014 as I write this. We actually started the first of the maps for 2015 back in July!

So…and here comes the sales part (look away now if you’re of a nervous disposition)…if you work in the tourism industry and would like to talk to us about some new maps for your website or brochures, then don’t hesitate. We can handle last minute requests but it makes it easier all round, for us and for you, if we get a bit more time to produce exactly what you want.

For enquiries, either skip over to the contact page on our website, or email us. It’s dead easy really. And we’re very friendly too.

Oh, and enjoy next year’s holiday too, wherever you happen to be going and whoever’s map you are using.

 

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Don’t get me started…

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More oddball thoughts, submitted on an occasional basis by our Guest Blogger:  Jack Diamond.

 

Well, this week I’ve put my thinking cap on and, amazingly, come up with a solution to some of our problems here in the UK.

The problems I’ve solved are to do with defence, border controls and financial budgets.

 

It was simple, really. No, it was. Listen…

The first step in my mind-blowingly simple plan is for us, and here I mean our leaders in Government and our military chiefs, to stop bombing and invading other countries. I know, it’s radical, isn’t it?

And, here’s how it works.

We pull all our overseas troops home to the UK. The UK currently has troops in a number of foreign countries (source) – Kenya, Sierra Leone, Brunei, Canada, Cyprus, Germany, Gibraltar and the Falkland Islands. There’s possibly more. And this list doesn’t include those we’ve invaded or bombed recently e.g. Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, and, going back a few more years, places like Kosovo.

So, now that we’re not bombing or invading other countries, what do we do with all these troops that we’ve brought home?

Easy.

We use them at ports and airports around the UK to bolster the struggling UK Border Control staff. After all, these military people are all part of our Ministry of Defence, so what better job for them to do than to actually, physically defend the UK’s borders?

The clue to this thinking is really in the name, the Ministry of Defence. It’s not called the Ministry of Attack, or the Ministry of Invade or Bomb Other Countries. Their job is to defend the UK and what better place to start than at our borders?

This policy of not bombing or invading other countries will also have a few other knock-on effects which will be positive. It will save us billions, yes billions of Pounds annually. In one conflict alone, Afghanistan, it’s cost the UK around £37 billion (source). That’s one hell of a price for a war which really has very little to do with us and which has probably contributed, along with our incursion into Iraq, to many of the terror atrocities here at home.

Our bombing of Libya is estimated to have cost around £950 million (source). And that was without any troops on the ground – allegedly. The outcome of this bombing? Libya is fast becoming classified as a ‘failed state’ (source).

So, there’s plenty of money to be saved by not invading or bombing people. Plus we get a big increase of personnel at our ports and airports, which can only be a good thing.

I could also get started on our stock of nuclear weapons (who are we planning to use these against? Our major enemy these days are terrorists at home and we certainly wont be nuking them, or at least I trust not). So, why do we need them?

But, that’s for another day. For now, bring our troops home and make the UK a safer place. Oh, and save a bucket load of money too.

 

 

(The views expressed in our Guest Blogs are personal opinions only and do not reflect the views of PCGraphics.)

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Location Maps – why do we need them?

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We’ve been in business since 1998 and, almost since Day 1, we’ve been producing location maps for businesses on a regular basis. The question though is why do businesses, and people in general, need location maps when it seems like just about everyone has a smart phone with access to Google Maps or similar apps?

Well, there’s obviously a need for them. We don’t produce location maps for fun, we produce them because people approach us and ask us (oh, and pay us to produce the map too, that’s important!).

I suppose a better question might be, why doesn’t Google Maps, or whoever, fulfil this requirement?

Perhaps it’s because it’s seen as a lazy way of interacting with a client who wants to visit your business location, office etc. Here’s our address, now go and look it up for yourself on the internet to find out how to get to us.

Also, if you are trying to contact potential clients through a print medium – a retail store advertising in a newspaper, for instance – you have to use a location map.

So, location maps do work and people need them, which probably explains why we’re still producing these types of maps even though Google has mapped (almost) the whole World.

The next question, having decided that it would be best if potential clients knew where to find your business, is ‘What kind of location map do I want?’

Well, there’s as many different styles of location map as there are businesses. Well, ok, not quite, but you get the general idea. You can have whatever size and style and colours you like. Everything from a map of the whole country showing your multiple locations…

Priory_Hospitals

To a map closely centred on your location, such as this one we produced for the St John’s Ambulance a few years ago…

Basic CMYK

You can also have direction to your offices, which helps if your location is a bit more difficult to find or where there is particular car parking areas to use, or one-way streets etc to navigate. All these can be shown on the map or on a panel next to it.

Shoreham_Port

Or, do you fancy more of a street map, showing the surrounding area, streets etc? This particular sample was for the Wrenwood Hotel in Boscombe, near Bournemouth. Invaluable for guests travelling to the hotel.

Wrenwood_LOCATION

And here’s another example. This one was produced for Audley Travel – one of our tour operator clients, situated at the end of the very picturesque New Mill Lane, just outside Witney in Oxfordshire. Audley use the location maps on their website.

audley_location

Walsh & Co, a firm of solicitors based in Cornwall, asked us to produce this map to highlight their location. Again, it’s also on their website.

Walsh&CoMap

Closer to home – closer to our home, anyway – this black and white location map was created recently for the Trouville Hotel in Sandown, on the Isle of Wight…

Trouville Sandown

And even mapping companies need location maps too. This was ours when we had offices in Old Woking, Surrey…

PCG_WOKING_LOCATION

And, remember, it doesn’t have to be for a business. We get requests for location maps for weddings, village and town hall events, museums and galleries and just about everything else you can think of. If people need to find you, then you probably need a location map.

If you like any of our sample maps here and think you’d like something similar for your own business, then do contact us. We’re more than happy to give you free advice and a quote for your map. All we need to know is a rough idea of what style of map you want, any logos etc to be included and whether you want directions to your location. Oh, and the address would be handy too!

There’s more info about location maps on our website, or drop us an email info@pcgraphics.uk.com

 

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Don’t get me started…

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More off-the-wall thoughts, submitted on an occasional basis by our Guest Blogger:  Jack Diamond.

 

This week I’m taking a look back in time with ‘Whatever Happened to…

 

First, whatever happened to – Repetitive Strain Injury?

Does anyone remember when repetitive strain injury was about as common as the adverts on Downton Abbey (for the uninitiated, Downton Abbey is a period drama on UK TV interrupted every few minutes, it seems, by adverts)? It was caused by doing the same actions, usually involving the upper arms or fingers, repeatedly and intensely over a period of time.

According to the NHS website repetitive strain was ‘a general term used to describe the pain felt in muscles, nerves and tendons caused by repetitive movement and overuse.’

So, basically, it was caused by using muscles a lot that hadn’t been used in a while previously.

And people were taking time off work for this and getting moved to do different jobs because of the ‘repetitive strain’ of doing that one task over and over again. There were even probably a few individuals who sought financial compensation from their employers for the effects of repetitive strain injury.

I wonder what today’s teenagers would make of repetitive strain? My guess is they’d probably ignore it. I mean, have you seen the speed teenager’s move their thumbs when texting or updating their Facebook statuses? And they do this for hours at a time – walking in the street, sitting on buses and trains, on the way to school, on the way home from school and, probably but who knows, during lessons at school as well.

Repetitive strain is a thing of the past. I can’t imagine any kid these days running to their mother, complaining about the pain in their thumbs from constantly texting.

Did it ever exist? Undoubtably, some people got sore muscles from doing one task too frequently over a period of time. I have the same problem when I kick a football around for 90 minutes non stop. My muscles ache.

Today’s kids, with their constant texting, have put paid to repetitive strain injury.

Whatever happened to – Acid Rain?

If you were around, and read the newspapers or listened to the news, in the 1970s or 1980s, you will undoubtably have heard of acid rain. It was, we were told, going to destroy all our forests and woodlands and, following that, probably civilisation as we know it. Well, what happened to it? Everything went quiet on the acid rain front.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I have no doubt that acid rain actually existed. In fact, if I remember my geography and physics lessons correctly, all rain is acidic. But this version of acid rain was apparently caused by coal fired power stations.

Obviously, we in the UK took steps to shut down our coal fired power stations. Problem solved.

Or not. From news reports of only a couple of years ago, China was building 363 new coal burning power stations. On top of that, India was building 455. There were 1,200 coal plants in the various stages of planning across 59 countries.

So, what happened to acid rain?

I’m not for one minute suggesting it never existed and that we were misled by governments, environmentalists and the sensationalist section of the tabloid press, but we have far, far more coal fired power plants than in the 1970s and 1980s and yet no-one speaks of acid rain these days.

Perhaps it’s simply because we’ve got bigger and better things to worry about these days?

Whatever happened to – Swine Flu?

You must remember the swine flu epidemic? It was only a few years ago and our government here in the UK was forecasting 65,000 deaths in this country alone.

So, what happened to it?

Well, there was swine flu and it did kill some people – mostly those with pre-existing conditions. How many people did it kill in the UK? Certainly not the 65,000 that the experts were expecting.

The actual number of deaths from swine flu in the UK was 457.

So, we had a massive over estimate of the number of deaths. What else? Oh, yes, the government, in their wisdom, made plans to buy 132 million doses of the swine flu vaccine. The population of the UK is about 64 million. So, that would have been more than two doses of the vaccine for each and every person in the UK, assuming that every person wanted the vaccine (or, indeed, wanted two doses of it).

Why, you have to ask? Why would any Civil Servant or Minister in the Government sign a contact for that number of vaccines?

The total cost of the swine flu pandemic was put at over £1.2 billion. That’s 1.2 billion Pounds of our tax payer’s money here in the UK.

So, what happened to swine flu?

Again, yes, it did obviously exist – 457 people died from it. But it wasn’t the massive, looming disaster that we were, again, led to believe.

 

So, I have to ask, do you believe it these days when governments, environmentalists or anyone else give us warnings of doom and gloom about how the world is going to end, imminently, if we don’t do something quickly (which, it seems, usually means paying money to someone or raising taxes)?

I, for one, have become slightly, just slightly, cynical over the years.

 

 

(The views expressed in our Guest Blogs are personal opinions only and do not reflect the views of PCGraphics.)

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Happy Birthday

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Happy Birthday…to us!

On the 1st October 2014 PCGraphics celebrated it’s 16th birthday. Yes, we started way back in 1998.

happy_birthday

We’ve been through some highs and lows in that time. Some of the highlights of the past 16 years were:

• Employing some great people

• Managing to get through those first difficult years when most new companies fail

• Winning some good contracts and having clients who actually become personal friends

• Having fun along the way

 

And, some of the less good things included:

• Employing a few people who simply weren’t interested in working

• Dealing with all the admin and red tape of running a company

• Trying to understand Balance Sheets

 

But, we must have been doing something right as we’re still around and doing business when a number of our competitors have gone to the wall.

So, Happy Birthday to us as we start year 17. Here’s to the next 16.

 

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(Where it all began – The Hall, Guildford. Our first offices)

 

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Company Director profile – Sally Cooney

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This is the second in our PCGraphics Company Director profiles. The first, for Paul, can be found here.
 
Here’s what Sally, our Production Director, has to say for herself.
 
I was born and brought up in Holmfirth, West Yorkshire. For those in the know, its where the TV show Last of the Summer Wine was filmed in the 70’s 80’ and 90’s – Compo, Clegg, Foggy etc. When I left home at the age of 19 to go to University, I’d make a point of watching Last of the Summer Wine to remind me of home.
 
last_of_the_summer_wine
(Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)
 
I was very studious at school all the way through my GCSE’s and A Levels, a bit of a swot by all accounts. I don’t mind saying that A Levels were quite probably the hardest thing I’ve ever done (including what I studied at University) – I did manage B,B,C in Geography, Social Biology and Maths / Statistics respectively. I also managed to find the time for another GCSE while I was doing my A Levels – GCSE in Russian, but don’t ask me to speak any of it now though!
 
 Those results were enough to get me to a decent red brick university to study Geography – in Southampton. Just about as far away from Holmfirth as you can get, but I didn’t mind that, I wasn’t planning on coming home mid term and the climate is significantly better down south!
 
You can read more about my work choices and how I ended up in cartography by following this link to another of our blog posts.
 
And so to life on the Isle of Wight – what a gem of a place to live! In between drawing maps and bringing up 2 young boys, I spend my time gardening, baking, running and dabbling on the sewing machine which was gifted to me by a kind neighbour. It’s a 1920s Singer crank handle manual sewing machine and its a work of art.
 
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On Saturdays, whenever possible, I like to participate in a Park Run at Newport which is a timed 3 mile route around Seaclose Park, the site of the annual Isle of Wight Music Festival. Occasionally the venue is moved to Appley Park in Ryde which is lovely – what could be better than running alongside the beach? I even manage to do some advertising with my PCG t-shirt on – you’ve got to take these opportunities where you can!park_run(Sally, left, sauntering past some back markers in the Park Run at the Appley Park site near Ryde)Well, that’s enough about me…probably more than enough!If you’ve landed on this page and wish to go to the first page of the blog, click here

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