More photos from Visit Isle of Wight

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Four miles off the south coast of England sits the Isle of Wight. The Island has a milder sub-climate than other areas of the UK and has been a holiday destination since Victorian times.

The main towns on the Isle of Wight are:

Newport is situated in the centre of the Island and is the county town or capital of the Island.

Ryde is the Island’s largest town with a population of around 30,000. Ryde has the oldest seaside pier in England and miles of sandy beaches.

Cowes is famous for the annual Cowes Week and is an international sailing centre.

East Cowes is best known for Osborne House, once the home of Queen Victoria.

Sandown is a popular seaside resort and is home to the Isle of Wight Zoo and the Dinosaur Isle museum which is built in the shape of a giant pterosaur.

Shanklin, which is now virtually joined to Sandown, attracts tourists with its high summer sunshine levels and sandy beaches. Shanklin Chine is the Island’s oldest attraction.

Ventnor on the south coast of the Island is built on the steep slopes of St Boniface Down.

The Isle of Wight also has it’s own flag which was registered on January 9th 2009.

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And, what’s more, we also have hovercraft!

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Photos below courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight.

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Above: Seagrove Bay in the north east of the Island.  (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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Above: Beach huts at Shanklin at night. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

Shanklin is situated on Sandown Bay, which stretches from Yaverland in the North to Luccombe in the South.

It was in Shanklin that Charles Darwin wrote his Origin of Species, which was published in 1859.

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Above: The Needles at sunset. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

The Needles is a row of three chalk stacks that rise out of the sea to the west of the Isle of Wight. The Needles takes its name from a fourth needle-shaped pillar called Lot’s Wife, which collapsed in a storm in 1764.

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Above: The needle-shaped pillar (Lot’s Wife) can be clearly seen in this engraving from a map of Hampshire published in 1759.

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Above: Appley Tower, to the east of Ryde. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

Appley Tower was built around 1875 as a folly in the grounds of the estate owned by the politician Sir William Hutt. A folly tower is a tower that has been constructed for ornamental rather than practical reasons. Appley Tower is one of the few surviving buildings from the estate and was built just above the beach in the form of a castle tower.

 

Did you know? The Isle of Wight is one of the richest dinosaur localities in Europe, with over 20 species of dinosaur having been recognised, some of which were first identified on the Island. Compton Bay, near Freshwater, features dinosaur footprints which are visible at low tide. (Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight, Wikipedia)

 

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