More old mapping – Glasgow 1945

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From our library of old maps, here are some extracts from the 1945 Bartholomew’s Pocket Plan of Glasgow.

At PCGraphics we used these maps as the basis to create royalty free maps for clients in the UK by adding new, up to date information gleaned from street surveys and aerial photography.

This methodology has today largely been superseded by the widespread availability of street level photography, such as Google Street View, meaning that we don’t need to visit every town, city and area in the UK which we map. This saves time and, more importantly, money for the client.

Click on any of the thumbnails to view a larger image.

 

You can find out more about how we create our maps at PCGraphics by following this link to our website.

There are also other pages of old maps here on this blog:

Birmingham – as it was 60 years ago
More old maps
London 1939
Ward-Lock Red Guide Books – Edinburgh
Ward-Lock Red Guide Books – Glasgow

If you pop over to our Pinterest boards, along with loads of samples of up to date maps produced by PCGraphics, there’s also a whole board dedicated to old mapping.

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Spot the Differences – the answers

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Last week we gave you two maps with 10 differences, how many did you find?

Here’s the answers, ringed in red on the map.

Screen Shot answer

(Map contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database rights 2016)

The map, above, is copyright Ordnance Survey. So, who are the Ordnance Survey? Here’s a very brief history.

The O.S. is the national mapping agency of Great Britain and is one of the world’s largest map producers. Ordnance Survey came about because of the lack of decent maps of Scotland following the Jacobite rebellion in 1745 and the threat of war with Napoleon.

The survey of Great Britain was originally carried out using triangulation methods but, more recently, aerial photography has become the chief source for updating and creating new mapping.

In April 2010, Ordnance Survey made available large amounts of data which, whilst still being O.S. copyright, is free to use. Ordnance Survey copyright lasts for 50 years, meaning that, currently, any O.S. mapping pre 1965 is now out of copyright.

Since 2011 Ordnance Survey’s headquarters have been at Adanac Park, Southampton, England.

 

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2015 – a review

…or, what we’ve been doing the past 12 months

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January 2015

On Foot Holidays

We work with many tour operators and tourism companies and the winter months are usually quite a busy time for us, updating maps for inclusion in next summer’s brochures.

These were just two of a number of new maps for On Foot Holidays.

OFH Template RGB OFH Template RGB

February 2015

We are fortunate to have worked with a number of clients over a period of many years. Solent are one of our regular clients.

Solent IW

March 2015

We began working with Assura back in 2013, creating walk maps for display in Doctor’s Surgeries and Health Centres.

A4 Assura template

April 2015

This is the third year we’ve worked with Open Studios, producing maps of towns and villages across the Isle of Wight highlighting the location of artist’s studios etc.

Template Template

May 2015

During May we worked on 50 maps for Tramlink Nottingham. This project consisted of 27 new maps plus revisions to the existing 23 maps which we also produced by PCGraphics.

New Style template 2015 New Style template 2015 New Style template 2015

June 2015

This month brought more work from the publishing company Goldeneye. This time it was amendments to their map of Kent.

goldeneye

July 2015

Holiday time for our kids, Seamus and Sean

Here they are being hatched from dinosaur eggs (that’s where children come from, right?) at Blackgang Chine, Isle of Wight.

Seamus and Sean

August 2015

Another regular client, Helpful Holidays, asked us to update the maps for their 2016 brochure.

Help Hols 2015 railways pathsHelp Hols 2015 N Cornwall pathsHelp Hols 2015 N Devon paths

September 2015

We first worked for Kirker Holidays about 15 years ago and, like many clients, they decided to use our services once again this year.

Kirker Athens Kirker template

October 2015

Our project for Kirker Holidays stretched into October as well, updating and creating new maps.

Kirker templateCPM2 Region Template.ai

November 2015

November brought another opportunity to work with a client we’d worked with back in January this year, On Foot Holidays.

OFH Template RGB OFH Template RGB

December 2015

New maps for New Experience Holidays, (do you see what we did there?), another existing client, were created in December.

NewExAndorra

New Experience template

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Liverpool 1946

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A year after World War 2 has finished and here we have one of the first post war maps of Liverpool to be produced.

This was a John Bartholomew & Sons map produced in late 1946. The map code B46 in the top left corner of the map gives a clue to the date. The letter B indicates the second half of the year and the number 46 gives the year.

This Bartholomew map of Liverpool is just one of many old maps we hold at PCGraphicsWe originally acquired full coverage of the UK in 50 year old, royalty free mapping to give us a base to work from when creating copyright free UK maps.

liverpool_coverliverpool_1liverpool_2liverpool_3liverpool_4liverpool_5liverpool_6liverpool_7liverpool_8liverpool_9liverpool_10liverpool_back_cover

The map below shows the original seven streets of Liverpool. This image was sourced from Wikipedia Commons. Below that is roughly the same area from the 1946 map. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Original_7_streets_of_Liverpool.jpg)

The third map, below, is from up to date 2015 Ordnance Survey data.

Original_7_streets_of_LiverpoolOriginal_7_streets_of_Liverpool_1946Original_7_streets_of_Liverpool_2015

Liverpool Castle, which can be seen towards the right hand edge of the original seven streets of Liverpool map, was built in the early part of the 13th century. In 1715 it was decided to demolish the castle and build a church in its place. Construction of St George’s church was completed in 1734. By 1825 the church had been pulled down and a new one built. In 1899 the church was again demolished and the Victoria Monument (marked on the 1946 map) erected in 1902.

You can find out more about how we create our maps at PCGraphics by following this link to our website.

There are also other pages of old maps here on this blog:

Birmingham – as it was 60 years ago
More old maps
London 1939
Ward-Lock Red Guide Books – Edinburgh
Ward-Lock Red Guide Books – Glasgow

If you pop over to our Pinterest boards, along with loads of samples of up to date maps produced by PCGraphics, there’s also a whole board dedicated to old mapping.

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More old maps…

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We’ve taken our lives in our hands once again, ventured into the dusty corner of the office and raided the filing cabinet to bring you some more scans of old UK maps, this time it’s from a book called ‘The Popular Road Book of Great Britain’.

The Popular Road Book is undated but, judging by some of the information on the maps, it must have been published just before the Second World War, so the late 1930s is our best guess (apparently, it was after the war that the Western Avenue in west London was changed from the A403 to the A40; the London map shown here has the Western Avenue as the A403, hence our rough guess for the map being mid to late 1930s).

The original book is quite battered and brown/grey now (after about 80 years it’s not surprising) but we’ve cleaned these scans up a bit in Photoshop so they look somewhat better.

If you look back through this blog you’ll find lots of other old maps and guide books which we’ve put online from time to time.

We originally purchased our library of old maps to help us create royalty free UK mapping. Going back a few years, Ordnance Survey was very restrictive, and expensive, to base any new mapping upon, so we were forced to go to great lengths (buying maps more than 50 years old plus street checking every town and city and, more latterly, using GPS to plot motorway alignments around the country) to make new maps.

Since April 2010 however, a lot of the restrictions have been lifted and it’s easier and cheaper to use Ordnance Survey data as the basis for any new UK maps.

The maps shown here are Birmingham, Bradford, Bristol, Cardiff, Coventry,
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Hull, leeds, Leicester, Liverpool, London, Manchester,
Newcastle, Nottingham, Plymouth, Portsmouth,
Sheffield, Southampton and Stoke.

Click on any of the maps to enlarge them.

Birmingham BradfordBristolCardiff Coventry EdinburghGlasgowHullLeedsLeicesterLiverpoollondonManchesterNewcastleNottinghamplymouthPortsmouthSheffieldSouthamptonStoke

Remember, you can find out about all our NEW maps on our website.

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PCGraphics on other social media:

PCGraphics website – customised digital mapping
Pinterest boards – currently over 500 samples of our work
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Linkedin – PCGraphics showcase page

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Ward-Lock Red Guide Books – Edinburgh

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Following on from our look at vintage Glasgow, Bath and Harrogate guide books, here we take a trip back to Edinburgh in 1952, courtesy of Ward-Lock’s Red Guide.

edinburgh_front_cover

Maps are an important part of any guide book but there were only three maps in the Red Guide to Edinburgh, which is quite surprising by today’s standards, especially considering that the Guide Book is getting on for 200 pages long.

The first map was an overview map of the area surrounding Edinburgh. Then, further into the Guide, came the map of central Edinburgh (an extract of which we’ve shown below) and, near the end, a map of the Portobello region.

One of our own maps of Edinburgh is shown here for comparison.

edinburgh_map

(Extract from the 1952 map of Edinburgh included in the Ward Lock Guide Book)

Edinburgh_Town_Plan

(Our own map of Edinburgh produced a few years ago for Thomson Local Directories)

Although the maps are interesting – and pretty essential in any guide book both in 1952 and today – the adverts in the Red Guides are also of interest and give a unique insight into the way things were then and how they’ve changed today.

In 1952 the predominant advertisers in the Guide Books were Insurance Companies, not something you’d find in too many Guide Books these days. In fact, there were six individual adverts for insurance, most of them full page advertisements, in the Edinburgh guide. There were also three adverts for Banks – the Westminster Bank, National Provincial Bank and the Standard Bank of South Africa.

edinburgh_advert_4  edinburgh_advert_3edinburgh_advert_2

The text in the Guide Book can be quite amusing too. Does anyone in the UK remember when shops used to close for a half day once a week? How about fishmongers closing on Monday afternoons; drapers and jewellers on Tuesdays; bakers, butchers, grocers, chemists, hairdressers and stationers on Wednesdays; plus most of the shops on Princes Street in Edinburgh on Saturday afternoons? Imagine having to keep track of that lot and arranging your weekly shop around when they were actually open! No wonder supermarkets, opening 24/7, took over.

early_closing

And, just in case you wanted to know how you should visit Edinburgh, we’ve included here the text from a few of the pages – all written in what seems like a rather quaint way, but this was probably standard for the time.

Edinburgh in Half a Day is typical of this:

If one has but half a day to devote to Edinburgh and no private car to speed – or hamper – one, it is possible (with the occasional aid of public conveyances and without overtaxing one’s legs) to ‘do’ most of the major sights, after a fashion; but while the New Town openly displays its charms and its story is such that he who runs may read, it must be borne in mind that the Old Town hides many of its rarest treasures in obscure corners – courts and closes, wynds and vennels – which baffle the hustling globe-trotter and can only be explored on foot.

 

how_to_see_edinburgh in_half_day_2

Some of the places of interest listed for Edinburgh in 1952 included the Public Library, the Register House and the Signet Library (but, please note that use of this library is granted only to applicants who have been ‘suitably recommended’).

places_of_interest

At PCGraphics we have many more of these Ward Lock Guide Books, plus other maps and tourist books, all more than 50 years old and some as old as 100 years. They were originally bought to give us ‘royalty free’ source material for creating town and city plans of the UK. That requirement has now been largely made redundant by the freeing up of Ordnance Survey data but they are still a fascinating insight into times gone by.

(You can click on any of the images above to view them at a larger size)

 

somehow_the_same

 

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London in maps around 1908

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This is part of an ongoing series on our blog looking back at old maps in our library. We have hundreds of old maps which we’ve collected over the years and which have helped us compile today’s new custom designed, copyright free maps.

Bacon’s Large-Print Map of London and the Suburbs was published around 1908. The map isn’t dated (some publishers still don’t put publication dates on their maps as people don’t want to buy ‘last year’s’ map) but, looking at some of the detail on the map, it’s possible to come up with a pretty good idea of the date.

london-title

In 1908, London hosted a Franco-British Exhibition which attracted 8 million visitors and celebrated the Entente Cordiale signed in 1904 by the United Kingdom and France. The Franco-British Exhibition was held near Shepherd’s Bush in West London, an area now called White City. Looking at the old map below you can see the exhibition site is marked, from which the map can be dated.

Below this we show the same area as it is today and it’s interesting to see how the area to the west of London has built up over the past 106 years.

london1

london1-new

(New map: Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database rights 2014)

The publisher of the map, George Bacon, was actually originally from New York State but moved to Britain in 1861 after which he set up numerous companies – everything from sewing machines to maps. Most of these ventures failed but the cartographic publishing company continued until it was later taken over by another firm. George Bacon operated from 127 Strand, in London.

This particular map of London was drawn at a scale of 2.5 inches to the mile. The two images below show the area to the north of the River Thames, very much as it still is today.

london2 london3

The extract below is of south west London, from Barnes out to Brentford. At the time of this map, Brentford was a separate town, not part of the urban sprawl of London.

london4

Next, are the Chelsea, Battersea and Wandsworth areas of London. If you know this area you’ll realise that, apart from a couple of new main roads, you could navigate pretty well by this 106 year old map today.

london5

The same can be said of the extract below, from Victoria in the north to Clapham Common in the south. The road layout is still almost the same today as it was in 1908.

london6

london7

Docklands in the east end of London has obviously changed dramatically, but go south of the river to Greenwich and beyond and things aren’t quite so different as they were a century ago. Which does all go to show why these old maps have been so useful to us in the past as the basis for our royalty free maps. In many areas, about 90% of the road network hasn’t changed at all which means, when you’re producing a new map which is copyright or royalty free, you only have to find and identify 10% of the roads which obviously saves a lot of time and money.

Apart from this George Bacon map of London, we have literally hundreds of other old maps which are out of copyright. The copyright on an Ordnance Survey map, and many other maps too, lasts for 50 years after which you are free to use them as sources etc without paying O.S. for the privilege. John Bartholomew and Son maps are slightly different, only because they attempted to change the copyright of their maps to 75 years about 10 years ago.

Previously in this series covering old maps we’ve looked at Ward Lock Red Guide Books to Bath  and Harrogate. More to come in the future.

 

somehow_the_same

 

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