More photos from Visit Isle of Wight

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Four miles off the south coast of England sits the Isle of Wight. The Island has a milder sub-climate than other areas of the UK and has been a holiday destination since Victorian times.

The main towns on the Isle of Wight are:

Newport is situated in the centre of the Island and is the county town or capital of the Island.

Ryde is the Island’s largest town with a population of around 30,000. Ryde has the oldest seaside pier in England and miles of sandy beaches.

Cowes is famous for the annual Cowes Week and is an international sailing centre.

East Cowes is best known for Osborne House, once the home of Queen Victoria.

Sandown is a popular seaside resort and is home to the Isle of Wight Zoo and the Dinosaur Isle museum which is built in the shape of a giant pterosaur.

Shanklin, which is now virtually joined to Sandown, attracts tourists with its high summer sunshine levels and sandy beaches. Shanklin Chine is the Island’s oldest attraction.

Ventnor on the south coast of the Island is built on the steep slopes of St Boniface Down.

The Isle of Wight also has it’s own flag which was registered on January 9th 2009.

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And, what’s more, we also have hovercraft!

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Photos below courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight.

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Above: Seagrove Bay in the north east of the Island.  (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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Above: Beach huts at Shanklin at night. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

Shanklin is situated on Sandown Bay, which stretches from Yaverland in the North to Luccombe in the South.

It was in Shanklin that Charles Darwin wrote his Origin of Species, which was published in 1859.

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Above: The Needles at sunset. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

The Needles is a row of three chalk stacks that rise out of the sea to the west of the Isle of Wight. The Needles takes its name from a fourth needle-shaped pillar called Lot’s Wife, which collapsed in a storm in 1764.

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Above: The needle-shaped pillar (Lot’s Wife) can be clearly seen in this engraving from a map of Hampshire published in 1759.

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Above: Appley Tower, to the east of Ryde. (View more photos on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page).

Appley Tower was built around 1875 as a folly in the grounds of the estate owned by the politician Sir William Hutt. A folly tower is a tower that has been constructed for ornamental rather than practical reasons. Appley Tower is one of the few surviving buildings from the estate and was built just above the beach in the form of a castle tower.

 

Did you know? The Isle of Wight is one of the richest dinosaur localities in Europe, with over 20 species of dinosaur having been recognised, some of which were first identified on the Island. Compton Bay, near Freshwater, features dinosaur footprints which are visible at low tide. (Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight, Wikipedia)

 

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More photos from Visit Isle of Wight

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The Isle of Wight, home to Queen Victoria, is also famous for boat building, flying boats, the world’s first hovercraft (developed by Sir Christopher Cockerell), and the testing and development of Britain’s space rockets.

Approximately half of the Isle of Wight is designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

Photos courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight.

Below: Ventnor, on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, photographed at night.  (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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Below: Bembridge Lifeboat Station, Isle of Wight. The first lifeboat service from Bembridge began in 1867. The new lifeboat station, below, was completed 2010 at a cost of £7,650,000. (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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View towards Bembridge, the easternmost point of the Isle of Wight. (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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Did you know: The 1970 Isle of Wight Festival was by far the largest and most famous (or infamous depending on your viewpoint) of the early music festivals in the UK. The high attendance, many of them without tickets, led the UK Government to pass the ‘Isle of Wight Act’ in 1971 preventing gatherings of more than 5,000 people on the island without a special licence. The attendance at the 1970 Festival held at Afton Farm has been estimated at around 600,000.

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(Image, above, courtesy Wikipedia)

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More photos from Visit Isle of Wight

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The Isle of Wight, the largest island in England, what a beautiful place to live.

Photos courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight.

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This is Appley Tower, towards the eastern end of the long sandy beach at Ryde on the Isle of Wight.  (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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Fisherman’s cottage on the beach at the bottom of Shanklin Chine, Isle of Wight. (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

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The duver at St Helens, Isle of Wight. A duver is an Isle of Wight dialect term for a large sand dune and there are several duvers around the Island. (View on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page)

 

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From the air…

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Bembridge Harbour, on the Isle of Wight, was previously known as Brading Haven – the harbour inlet stretched inland to where the town of Brading is now situated. After several abortive attempts, Brading Haven was eventually drained and Bembridge Harbour formed by the building of the causeway which can be seen in the foreground of the photo.

The causeway is now a road but was originally built as a rail line linking the towns of St Helens and Bembridge.

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Yarmouth, below, on the Isle of Wight, is one of the smallest towns in the UK with a population of around 800. The pier in the foreground is the longest wooden pier open to the public in the UK.

The Wightlink ferry (taking cars and foot passengers between Yarmouth and Lymington) can be seen to the right of the photograph.

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Both photos courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight. More superb photos can be found on their Facebook page.

 

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Yarmouth, Isle of Wight

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Great view of Yarmouth from the air (courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight), with the ferry leaving for Lymington at the top of the photo – click on the photo to enlarge it.

Yarmouth is situated in the west of the Island, see the map below, and is one of the smallest towns in the United Kingdom. According to the UK Census in 2001 it had a population of 791.

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Courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight

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More stunning photos from the Visit Isle of Wight website

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A few more photos published recently on the Visit Isle of Wight Facebook page and website.


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 Castlehaven, near Niton

newtown_creek Newtown Creek

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Freshwater Bay just after the recent storms

yaverlandYaverland Beach, near Sandown

 

Photos courtesy of  Visit Isle of Wight.  More photos on their Facebook page.

 

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Why we moved to the Isle of Wight

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Six more views of the Isle of Wight. Can you see why we decided to move here?

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(The cliffs at Culver with the Yarborough Monument visible on top)

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(Bembridge Harbour at dawn)

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(View over Brading Marsh)

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(St Catherine’s Oratory. Known as the Pepperpot, it was built in 1328 as a lighthouse)

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(Looking across Sandown Bay)

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Sunset at Freshwater Bay)

 

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Photos courtesy of  Visit Isle of Wight.  More photos on their Facebook page.

 

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Bembridge Lifeboat station by moonlight

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Bembridge Lifeboat station by moonlight. Bembridge is situated on the most easterly point of the Isle of Wight and lays claim to be the largest village in England (population about 4,000).

The lifeboat station was completed in Autumn 2010.

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Photo courtesy of  Visit Isle of Wight.  More photos on their Facebook page.

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Something nice to start off with

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This is Steephill Cove on the Isle of Wight, photographed by moonlight.

Steephill Cove is situated near Ventnor on the south of the Island and is only accessible on foot, which probably adds to its charm. It’s on the Isle of Wight Coastal Path and can get quite busy in the height of summer, especially when the tide’s fully in. Very picturesque though and well worth a visit.

At the top of the cliffs, above the beach, is Ventnor Botanic Gardens. The microclimate in this area allows a surprising range of Mediterranean plants to flourish. Until 2012, the Botanic Gardens were owned by the Isle of Wight Council and were free to enter. Now, unfortunately, there’s an admission charge which tends to discourage many locals from visiting. But don’t get us started on that topic…..!

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The photo is courtesy of Visit Isle of Wight. You may like to look at their Facebook page which has loads more lovely photos.

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